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Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)
reserve board. this republican ben bernanke who preceded obama recognizes one very visible thing, the obstruction that's going on in congress renders the fiscal policy -- and you recognize that there's outright obstruction going on in congress that stops any fiscal policy, what are you going to do? >> what policy? >> it's the only tool left. >> i talk to republicans all the time. i'm a reporter, they're really thinking of this as a political issue. this is a stimulus pae f obama and obama and the a republicans should be embracing this. >> romney has said that he opposes this -- romney has also said that he will not reappoint ben bernanke. there's not a lot of sympathy for bernanke inside that campaign or the gop, that interests me a lot. i'm asking a difficult question, i don't think there's a direct -- i'm not saying that bernanke is deliberately doing qe-3, because probably it won't work in the next six weeks anyway. >> it hasn't worked up until now. >> the federal reserve is like the supreme court, it's now controlled by left wing democrats. >> here's what i think, this is buy
that are doing their best to generate good data and why does this overused cliche matter so much? ben bernanke said he's going to continue to buy bonds to keep interest rates down, so that this purchasing manager's number won't be an aberration. when you examine the fundamental stocks, you are playing what's known as the micro. when you take into account the big data numbers like the purchasing manager's index, you're making a macro analysis. again though like the idea of fighting the fed this micro/macro dichotomy might mean nothing to you unless you took ec 101. let's put it in terms that everybody can understand. anyone who's been to a museum or taken an art class knows that for years artists tried to paint pictures as if they were perfectly -- let's say they tried to capture the exact look. like a kodak camera. okay? that's called realism as the painters are indeed realistic. but as art progressed in the late 19th and early 20th century, you tend to get more -- let's say impressionist, less realist and then expressionists as the artists strugged to get beyond the four walls of the canvas,
of white noise, maybe people listen to ben bernanke yesterday. it just didn't add up. i can't tell you what was going on. >> what didn't add up, rick? how about the milton friedman stock? i know you've been all over that all day, so i brought a quote for you, rick. >> uh-oh. >> i brought a quote. milton friedman in his own words. now, rick, i know what you said, that anna schwartz -- >> i figured you were on for a reason today. >> what's that? >> i figured you were here for a reason. >> go ahead. >> i'm here to talk about jobs, but if we could have an aside, discussion, me and rick on the side. here's what milton friedman said in his own words in 2000. now the bank of japan's argument is, oh, well, we've got the interest rate down to zero, what more can we do? it's very simple. they can buy securities and they can keep buying them and providing high-powered money in until the high powered money gets the economy in an expansion. >> must have been a fun dinner conversation around the friedman table. >> exactly. >> i'm only talking about credit crisis issues. only give me quotes after the summ
was an advocate for open-ended qe long before fed chairman ben bernanke announced qe infinity. >> now chicago fed president charles evans is ready to take on critics of the plan. >>> we're kicking off the fourth quarter with the biggest bull of all the squawkmarket masters. the odds of hitting dow's 17,000 by the end of next year are looking better and better says jeremy siegel. the third hour of "squawk box" starts right now. ♪ >>> good morning again. welcome back to "squawk box" here on cnbc. i'm becky quick along with joe kernen and andrew ross sorkin and our guest host has been craig barrett, the former chairman and ceo of intel, obviously we have a lot more to discuss with him but we also have many other big guests who are joining us through the hour, don't forget that this is the beginning of the fourth quarter, you can start it off with our portfolio strategy session, speaking with jeremy siegel about the market events likely to drive the fourth quarter including the november election. coming up at 8:30 a.m. eastern, cnbc's exclusive interview with chicago fed president charlie evans, lo
from ben bernanke. >> two big downgrades on two big companies. microsoft says momentum will slow. >> and facebook's stock is up 30% from the july lows. >>> and julia boorstin with a sitdown with facebook's cheryl sandberg. >>> futures ant rise and the fourth quarter gets under way. major indices coming off a third quarter that was their best quarterly performance in two years. but there's a lot for wall street to digest this week waiting for today's monetary policy speech from bernanke. and the big jobs number is coming up on friday. it's been said that q3 was characterized by expectations from central banks, that we got what we wanted and that's not necessarily going to be the picture for this quarter. >> you're fighting worldwide feds. if you don't like the market, i understand expectations lowered along with estimates lowered. all you have to do is beat estimates even if they're lowered and you have the various feds behind you. still got a good market. >> evans this morning on "squawk" is few moments ago saying he'd like to see twist go all the way through 2013. there are thin
is benefitting our economy more broadly. >> that was chairman of the federal reserve ben bernanke yesterday discussing the fed's impact on the recovery of the housing market. and joining us now, co-host of cnbc's squawk on the street david faber, and doug lebda. good to have you both onboard this morning. it seems to me housing always seems like a separate issue that maybe didn't get talked about as much. is that retrospectively incorrect? because it does seem so fundamental, david. >> it's fundamental in the economy in many ways. certainly helped us during the boom period in housing that we saw adding to gdp, construction, and so many other things. people refinancing their homes. it hasn't been discussed that much, you're right, particularly given that the president seems to have backed off a bit, perhaps, on a number of plans that would've relieved people from mortgages that they otherwise are not in a great position to pay but there was a lot of political opposition to that. but housing is starting to come back. we are starting to see real signs of not just stabilization but even perhaps
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)